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Area 51 is condemned

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more on area 51

I had been thinking about certain UFO "cult" followings or tendencies within or around the U.S. Air Force.

Area 51 is Roswell, New Mexico, but Air Force bases or less official facilities with runways do exist is various towns in the Southwest.

Cults usually mean drugs, so let us admit, at least in theory, that the Air Force has a drug problem. Again, Area 51 is in the Southwest, so let us try to get some cultural background.

There are a lot of positive aspects to the culture of that area, but also, unfortunately, quite a drug scene, (mostly Jalisco Nueva GeneraciĆ³n, because the Sinaloa cartels keep more toward California in the United States.) Marijuana, peyote, LSD, and other hallucinogens are popular as well as the usual stimulants and narcotics, and the hot desert sun alone is quite enough to cause dramatic hallucinations and mirages without any drugs. You really have to keep your cool there: it may take more than just nightfall and a cool evening to recover from daytime heatstroke.

Air Force personnel have both the means and a strong motive to deal drugs internationally. They live on a fixed income of military basic pay, which isn't much, and they have access both to aircraft and to a high level of secrecy on the honor system to carry out missions.

Those are the means, motive, and opportunity for the dealing part. We cannot say it doesn't happen, and there is always a use problem along with drug dealing. The blue pill / red pill thing. Amphetamines for a 48-hour straight mission or narcotics to sleep if the mission is cancelled at the last minute. It's too much part of popular Air Force movie culture to ignore. The FBI with all its movie warnings and attention to the movie industry would be well aware of that "popular" aspect of military drug culture, but it's not directly under FBI or DEA jurisdiction per se: that would be the AFIC, a separate military criminal investigative agency.

People are "seeing things that other people don't see" at Area 51. That is part of a very strong pro-commitment involuntary mental health care political subculture. It's very, very professional and slicker than snot. There is no way out of that system, ever, once a legal allegation of mental illness is made. It's a one-shot one-sided civil court action, with no checks and balances, no defense, and no recourse, and civil rights are gone for life without any possibility of redress.

That is what the number 51 represents: one card short of a full deck, a well-known euphemism or metaphor for someone who is not thinking quite clearly or with the full capacity of a sound mind.

The ace of spaces was taken from a full deck of cards and laid on someone's grave in Vietnam, so only 51 cards are left, which is a whole other story, but I believe it sheds a little more light on military involvement with the civil commitment process for involuntary mental health care, and some of the dirty games they play behind the scenes. Because in the end, mental health is all about taking away the guns and the gun rights, and it all comes down to a sneaky conniving back-handed good-old-boys dishonorable discharge, straight out through the doctor's office, snicker-snicker, hardy-har-har, without any due process of law, even for someone who has never actually served in the military or ever been properly subject to that jurisdiction.

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